Rail Strike Averted

The Senate on Thursday voted overwhelmingly to impose a labor agreement between rail companies and their workers who have been locked in a stubborn stalemate, moving with uncommon speed to avert a potential holiday season rail strike that would jeopardize shipping across the country.–Emily Cochraine for The New York Times.

The Bills

H.J.Res.100 – To provide for a resolution with respect to the unresolved disputes between certain railroads represented by the National Carriers’ Conference Committee of the National Railway Labor Conference and certain of their employees.

H.Con.Res.119 – Providing for a correction in the enrollment of H.J. Res. 100. (A measure to add seven days of paid medical leave to the agreement.)

The votes:

https://clerk.house.gov/Votes/2022490

https://clerk.house.gov/Votes/2022491

https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_votes/vote1172/vote_117_2_00372.htm

https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_votes/vote1172/vote_117_2_00371.htm

Rep. Tenney (NY-22) gives her reasons for her opposing both bills

I voted “No” on H.J.Res. 100, To provide for a resolution with respect to the unresolved disputes between certain railroads represented by the National Carriers’ Conference Committee of the National Railway Labor Conference and certain of their employees. This resolution would impose the tentative agreement between railroad companies and railway unions, regardless of whether they were ratified or rejected by each union. After President Biden failed to negotiate a new contract between the railroad companies and railway workers, he asked Congress to undermine the rights of these workers and impose his negotiated deal. Rank and file union members rejected this deal, and this resolution ignored their opposition to this deal. While it is important to avoid a rail strike, this should be accomplished by good-faith negotiations, not by Congress imposing a deal supported by union bosses and railroad companies, but opposed by rank-and-file railway union members. This bill passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 290-137.

I voted “No” on H.Con.Res. 119, Providing for a correction in the enrollment of H.J. Res. 100. This bill would amend the tentative agreement between railroad companies and railway unions to include seven paid days of sick leave. Instead of allowing the railway unions and companies to return to the negotiating table to amicably negotiate a new contract, Congress chose to impose the agreement rejected by the rank-and-file union members and make this change to the agreement. This is exactly the opposite approach that Congress should have taken. I believe both the rank-and-file railway workers and railroad companies should have continued negotiating a deal that both sides accept. By changing the deal, this disincentivizes dealmaking in future negotiation processes, and instead incentivizes both parties to simply have Congress impose the provisions that they support, the opposite of how the process should work. This bill passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 221-207.

Other NYS Officials:

Rep. Joe Sempolinski (NY-23) voted yes on the first measure which would implement the rail agreement but voted no on the measure that would include the additional paid sick days.

Reps. Stefanik (NY-21), Tenney (NY-22) and Zeldin NY-01) voted no on both measures.

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About whungerford

* Contributor at NewNY23rd.com where we discuss the politics, economics, and events of the New New York 23rd Congressional District (Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, (Eastern) Ontario, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben,Tioga, Tompkins, and Yates Counties) Please visit and comment on whatever strikes your fancy.
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2 Responses to Rail Strike Averted

  1. GaryI Perry says:

    What are your thoughts on their votes and their reasoning?

    Like

  2. whungerford says:

    Gary, I’m glad a rail strike was averted; I’m sorry the sick time provision was defeated. Votes in the House and Senate show Republicans were divided on the first question. For a minority in the Senate to block sick time (and for House Republicans to vote against it) was cruel.

    Railroad workers have worked without a contract for two years; the suggestion that this is a normal labor dispute that would be quickly resolved during a strike is unreasonable. Some say that President Biden should pressure the railroads to offer workers a better deal; perhaps he will.

    Like

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