Get Politically Active: Social Security Tax Rates

discuss

 

“Get Politically Active”  is an occasional entry that contains a document on a current political issue.  It will be one page long and easy to copy. Consider emailing this to contacts that might be interested in this topic.  Someone may want to pass this out at a Town Hall Meeting.

Background: In a Press Release, Rep. Tom Reed claims that the Social Security Administration has unfairly “raided” the “Retirement Fund (Old-Age  & Survivor Insurance) in favor of the Disability all 11 times funding changes happened. That is not true, and the following chart, from the Center of Budget Policy Priorities shows it. Five of the 11 allocations of worker’s payroll deductions (1979, 1980, 1983, 1984 and 1997) the SSA actually increased the Retirement Fund and decreased Disability Fund.

Other Social Security articles from the New NY 23rd.

Go To Historical Social Security Rates for a pdf copy of the table below, or click on the chart for a jpeg. To see or download the full CBPP’s report (6 pages) “Congress Needs to Boost Disability Insurance Share of Payroll Tax by 2016” report click here.

Historical Social Security

Old-Age & Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance

Historical OASI & DI Tax Rates

GPA=SS
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About pystew

Retired Teacher, political science geek, village trustee. I lean a little left, but like a good political discussion. My blog, the New NY 23rd (http://newny23rd) is about discussing the issues facing the people of our new congressional district. Let's hear all sides of the issues, not just what the candidates want us to hear.
This entry was posted in Economics, Health Care, Reed's Views, Seniors, Uncategorized, Veterans and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Get Politically Active: Social Security Tax Rates

  1. whungerford says:

    Sadly, Tom’s hostility to Social Security isn’t likely to be overcome with facts. I believe it is based on a core belief that peoples’ welfare, even as conservative an idea as retirement insurance, isn’t the responsibility of government, that all such programs, however successful, ought to be private for profit enterprises. Tom’s disregard for facts is evident in his statement “government cannot create jobs” which appears in his meeting handouts.

    • josephurban says:

      I would say government creates one too many jobs in Tom’s case.

    • pystew says:

      The right side of Tom’s mouth says that “government cannot create jobs” while left side tells us of all the jobs that the Keystone Pipeline will provide us.

    • whungerford says:

      We see that Reed’s statements aren’t intended to be factual. His base must recognize that his words reflect their common belief–private jobs good; government jobs no good. Since Reed’s view isn’t based on fact but rather feelings, how do we properly “frame the debate?”

      • pystew says:

        Framing is based on emotions. We don’t use his terms, we promote our values. Bear with me since I’m still learning…

        One purpose of government is to plan and invest for a better future. Our parents/grandparents did. In the 1950’s government workers sweated to create President Eisenhower’s Interstate Highway system. They built new schools and colleges. Their graduates, including veterans using the GI Bill, jump-started the middle class, and the economy grew.

        The government took responsibility to provide for medical research, improved communications, and develop more-efficient transportation systems. They have evolved into the wonders that we take for granted today—longer lives, satellites, the internet, cell phones, safer and fuel-efficient automobiles. We can’t forget how much weather forecasting has improved in our life-times.

        To develop a better environment, the government is backing new, efficient green technology projects. They have begun to find their way into new Industries, which have improved our lives. They will continue to do so.

        .

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