Martha Robertson is the right choice for students and young people.

The following article was written by guest columnist Paolo Cremidis, from Elmira, NY. Paolo is a friend of the New NY 23rd and is in his last semester at Brooklyn College. He is working on a double  major –Political Science and Journalism.

pollingstation

I’m an NRA member, a Union activist, a student, and an advocate for students. Ever since Congressman Tom Reed was elected in 2010 he has failed the students and young people of the Southern Tier. Whether it was denying that he voted to increase our student loan rates. Or take away the choice for us as students to stay on our parent’s plan by voting to repeal the Affordable care act he does not stand for the future of the Southern tier.

We have a choice as young people to decide our future. We can vote for Tom Reed and have someone who is too afraid to talk about his voting record or we can choose a real advocate. For the past four years Tom has washed his hands of our problems, blaming the lack of action on student debt on the Congress itself. I was taught that if someone is looking to blame anyone but themselves for their actions, that person is not to be trusted. student-debtEvery time Tom justified a vote he took in Congress on the issue of student debt, he justified it as if he was voting to reduce our debt. Someone like that should not be in charge of increasing our student loan interest rates, because he will never give a straight answer on this issue.

 

We live in a diverse beautiful district with many emerging communities and industries. We have the potential to spur economic growth and have the economy which allows us to come back home. Let’s face it, since 2010 youth unemployment in the Southern Tier has been notoriously high. Politicians like Tom talk about ways to spur economic growth by attacking public education, and signing pledges to outsource jobs. Yet if you approach him on these issues he will deny his own record. We can move beyond this petty politician and his sad bickering.

YouthVote1.largeWe need someone who will stand up for young women and our LGBT community. Who will support young women against sexual assault that plagues our campuses, and actually fight for legislation to end campus sexual assault. A fierce advocate for middle class jobs for millennials and not using our wages to support tax cuts for his buddies.  We need someone who will actually fight for veterans not call it bipartisan when both Democrats and Republicans get it wrong and agree to cut veterans benefits.

The person who will represent all of us and not just some of us is Martha Robertson. She’s not afraid of standing up for the people of the Southern Tier. This November 4th I am pulling the lever for Martha not as a Democrat but as a student staggered by student debt. Congressman Reed has not addressed our issues since day one, Martha pledges to reduce student debt and fight for the future of the Southern Tier. We have the ability to reclaim our home, and actually build a sustainable 21st economy. Martha Robertson is the choice for us; she will put students before the oil companies, before the wealthiest Americans. The choice is ours; we can begin to end the student debt crisis. But in order to do that we need to ensure that we have an advocate in Congress, Martha Robertson is that person. She deserves all of our support and will fight for us, the choice is ours we are the future let us win this for Martha.

 

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About pystew

Retired Teacher, political science geek, village trustee. I lean a little left, but like a good political discussion. My blog, the New NY 23rd (http://newny23rd) is about discussing the issues facing the people of our new congressional district. Let's hear all sides of the issues, not just what the candidates want us to hear.
This entry was posted in 2014, Constituents, Economics, Education, Environmental, Hydrofracking/Gas& Oil Industry, pro-life/pro-choice, Reed's Views, Shutdown, Veterans and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

37 Responses to Martha Robertson is the right choice for students and young people.

  1. Deb Meeker says:

    Tom Reed “washes his hands” of his voting record and student concerns. Agree completely, Paolo.

  2. BOB McGILL says:

    so Paolo is working on a double major –Political Science and Journalism. Two low paying, dead end careers. Could it be that Paolo is just out to ” MILK ” a minority status ? One simple question, if you can’t get your kids to do regular household chores, like mowing the lawn, putting out the trash or clean their own rooms, what makes you think sending them to college is going to provide them a job ? When the Army doesn’t want 70% of them, ( millennials ) who do you think would want them ?

    • BOB McGILL says:

      for you who have a short memory
      http://www.military.com/NewsContent/0,13319,90736,00.html‎CachedSimilar
      Not if you’re a Ritalin-taking, overweight, Generation Y couch potato – or some …
      Previous Defense Department studies have found that 75 percent of young …

      • pystew says:

        Bob, GIGO–Garbage in–garbage out. I’m not even going to try to play around with your link to get it to work.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          ARE YOU TO LAZY TO TYPE A FEW SEARCH WORDS ? You aren’t interested in the truth or someone else’s opinion are you ! Like when you were teaching, you think you are the only one in the room who knows anything. Well you’re WRONG 😛

    • solodm says:

      That was a simple question for sure. Jealousy doesn’t look well on anyone, Bob, but even worse on a man whose inexperience leads his judgements.

    • whungerford says:

      Political Science and Journalism, two low paying, dead end careers? Not necessarily, and we do need political scientists and journalists. Perhaps Paolo will be our representative in Congress someday–hardly low paying, $174,000 for part time work with benefits.

    • pystew says:

      Bob, looks like you can’t disagree with the theme of the article–that Tom Reed is not reacting to the needs of the next generation of adults, so you attack the messenger. Your own biases are showing. Why would you think that a college senior with a double major is “lazy”? I agree that having a double major puts him in a minority class—but one that most would envy.

      • BOB McGILL says:

        time will tell, but a degree is no guarantee of a job. Never said he may be lazy. Journalists make about 43,000 average, but so does a manager at Wal-Mart.

        • pystew says:

          No, you didn’t call him lazy. You suggested that he was a ” MILK ” a minority status and then listed actions of a lazy young person. I can put 2 and 2 together. If you didn’t mean he would be lazy what did you mean by a “Milk a minority status”?

          • BOB McGILL says:

            SO HOW MANY YEARS OLD COLLEGE DID IT TAKE FOR YOU TO LEARN THAT TWO AND TWO IS FOUR ?
            still deleting my comments I see 🙂

          • Anne says:

            Actually, I think I understand the source of Bob’s confusion on this one minor point; an easy mistake, maybe, since he didn’t go to college himself. But Bob: when someone carries a double major in college they don’t pay double for that (or receive double financial aid, which I imagine is the real source of your distress here). It means that he has to carry probably a very heavy course load and satisfy the hour requirements of two majors, in addition to whatever gen ed or distribution requirements the college itself has.

      • BOB McGILL says:

        ” Martha Robertson is the right choice for students and young people ” is the theme isn’t it ? Just because you think Martha can change the world all by herself doesn’ t mean she is the right choice. I simply showed that college isn’t the right choice for everyone.
        Just like deb, who says she doesn’t take advantage of preferential treatment for women owned business, I suppose that with a name like Paolo he is going to claim that he is not a minority.

        • Anne says:

          Hmmm….McGill….Scottish, right? Does that mean you’re a drunk? Paolo is an Italian name; as far as I know, Italians aren’t out there claiming minority status.

    • Anne says:

      I must have missed the part where Paolo says he won’t clean his own room or mow his own yard. Seriously, Bob, a new personal best (by which I mean a new personal low): inanity, inaccuracy AND bigotry, all in one reply! And in your own words!

  3. BOB McGILL says:

    David Will • February 6, 2014

    It’s time for a large number of Americans to hear what might seem like a harsh message: A degree from a four-year university might not be for you. Popular culture would cast this frank assessment as elitist. But that’s a toxic myth that needs to vanish because the stakes are too high. A new study by Young Invincibles, a think tank geared toward issues facing young Americans, estimates that high youth unemployment costs the government about $25 billion in lost tax revenue. All the while, there are three million jobs that employers can’t fill because too many workers lack the requisite skills.

    Policymakers and university administrators have admirably worked to expand access to college over the past several decades. In terms of enrollment rates, their efforts have been successful — matriculation increased by thirty seven percent between 2000 and 2010. So, the good news is that we’re getting young adults on campus. But we are profoundly failing them as a country after that; America’s graduation rate sits at an abysmal 53 percent, including community colleges. This disparity betrays a critical disconnect, one not discussed often enough — that a large swath of those lured to college should never have attended.

    Seemingly insurmountable odds work against the typical young American. A college graduate today has to contend with an average of nearly $30,000 in student loan debt. The overall jobless rate for those between sixteen and twenty four is fifteen percent, more than double the national average. That said, the reality is that a large number of college students have no business being at four year universities.

    American culture aggressively pushes the college experience and dismisses skeptics as snobs. Master plumbers, for example, make roughly between $50,000 — approximately the national average — and $80,000 a year. So why is it considered so wrong to encourage people to pursue the profession, or another like it, instead of a college degree? One path all but ensures a life in the middle class; for far too many, the other only guarantees crushing debt and no degree.

    Relentlessly playing up the importance of a degree from a four-year university perpetuates an ironic snobbery. Those who emphasize the importance of a four-year degree often do so to the detriment of other paths to a prosperous life. We blindly push people toward college without considering if it’s actually the best option for the individual student. Meanwhile, community colleges and vocational schools, two phenomenal avenues to the middle class, are ignored. Advocates of college for all have created a culture that shuns people’s choices to pursue anything else.

    These destructive cultural attitudes manifest in government policy. States simply do not prioritize community colleges. “Between 1999 and 2009, community college funding increased just one dollar per student, while per-student funding at private research universities jumped almost $14,000,” write Eduardo Padron and Anthony Marx in US News and World Report. Large universities will obviously require more money overall to function, but the disparity in need can’t be that great. Government investment in community colleges is a sound one; an associate’s degree is a low-cost, high-reward chance at higher education and a better life.

    Other countries have already figured out that pushing every citizen into a four-year university is unproductive. Germany’s youth unemployment rate is 7.8 percent, while 5.1 percent of Germans overall are out of work. A huge secret to Germany’s success lies in its emphasis on apprenticeships. Students there have the option to apply directly to employers for training contracts starting at 16 years old. The program harnesses free market demand to meet employers’ needs. There’s no ludicrous stigma surrounding the process because people have seen that it works. The country is Europe’s economic engine partially because of the program’s success.

    The disparity between U.S. college enrollment and graduation rates is too vast to ignore. The fact is that, for many, college just isn’t the best investment. Political correctness is toxic and indulgent. It’s self-righteous censorship that too often harms the people it claims to help. The perpetual fear to encourage millennials to pursue anything other than a four-year degree hurts those very young adults. This timidity prevents advocacy for critical issues like funding for apprenticeships and community colleges. In this seemingly jobless economic recovery, one thing I won’t tolerate is continuing to leave young Americans behind.

    David Will is a religion major from Chevy Chase, Md. He can be reached at dwill@princeton.edu.

    • whungerford says:

      David Will’s view is overly mercenary–college isn’t necessarily career training. Democracy requires educated citizens. As Lincoln is said to have written: “I’ll study and be ready…”

      • BOB McGILL says:

        but politicians count on the voters being uninformed and ignorant of the facts don’t they ? I mean, Cuomo says he will wait for the Science before making a decision on fracking, but the report saying fracking is SAFE has been kept a secret for almost 2 years.

        • pystew says:

          Bob, the article is about how Tom Reed is hurting a large section of the NY 23rd. Your comments about Cuomo are out of place. Why don’t you defend Tom Reed’s record? Probably the same reason that his camping doesn’t promote his record…he is afraid of what will happen if the voters know the truth.

          • BOB McGILL says:

            NO, my comment is about politicians, mostly democrats. Your OPINION about Tom is just that, an OPINION. Some states are doing very well with the present congress, it’s the state that is causing the biggest problems for the 23rd , so why blame Tom ?

          • BOB McGILL says:

            well, they ain’t going to find the TRUTH here !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          • BOB McGILL says:

            you say my ” comments about Cuomo are out of place ” but fracking is a major issue in the upcoming election, isn’t it ? So Cuomo and Martha hide the truth and when the election is over New York gets FRACKED no matter who wins.

  4. For the record I hold down a full time job. I think its sort of hilarious that the biggest criticism to my article, wasn’t a challenge to my argument. But that I am somehow unemployed? Or that I don’t clean my room? Or that I don’t mow my lawn?

  5. BOB McGILL says:

    still deleting my comments I see 🙂

    • pystew says:

      Yep. I only delete the ones that are persona;l attacks and have nothing to do with the topic. I realize what your topic is (“mostly democrats”) but the topic of the article that you are supposed to be commenting about is why the Youth of the NY 23rd should support Martha Robertson for Congress.

      You do realize the more comments we get the higher the raking we have on Google and Bing. Thanks.

    • pystew says:

      Yep, Bob. I only delete the ones that are persona;l attacks and have nothing to do with the topic. I realize what your topic is (“mostly democrats”) but the topic of the article that you are supposed to be commenting about is why the Youth of the NY 23rd should support Martha Robertson for Congress.

      You do realize the more comments we get the higher the raking we have on Google and Bing. Thanks.

      • BOB McGILL says:

        yeah and you need all the help you can get 🙂
        One thing, this blog is nothing but a PERSONAL ATTACK ON TOM AND THERE IS NO TRUTH IN IT !!!!!

        • pystew says:

          Rules for commenting intelligently here and elsewhere:

          Stick to the subject.
          Try to state your point clearly and succinctly.
          Your opinion may be interesting, someone else’s opinion less so.
          Don’t bother to echo propaganda–no one cares.
          If you quote something, cite the source.
          Be polite, avoid insult and innuendo.
          As Tom Reed claims toothlessly for his facebook page, “Content that is explicit, racial, or vulgar in any form … will be removed.
          Constructive, relevant comments are welcome.

          • BOB McGILL says:

            have you read these rules ? You people are the worst offenders.

            I know, I know, don’t do as I do, do as I say ! 😛

  6. whungerford says:

    Martha Robertson is the right choice for students and young people; it would be good if many vote Nov. 4th.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      do you realize that if you add up all the things that Martha is against there isn’t much left ? Is a college degree necessary to work picking grapes or milking cows, flipping burgers @ Micky D’s or working in retail ?

      • whungerford says:

        No Bob, I don’t realize that. Things that Martha opposes mostly ought to be opposed.

        A college degree may not be necessary for some jobs, but it is a good thing to have nonetheless. Higher education isn’t necessarily vocational–many with degrees in Aeronautical Engineering will never design an airplane, but they and all of us may often benefit from their education in other ways.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          well then don’t complain about student debt, in the real world a basic education should come first. If you know you will never become an Aeronautical Engineer and will never design an airplane, maybe you should educate yourself to make a living instead. But NO if you go to college you may be able to delay working for 4 more years.
          Did you see, on the news, that Ford is going to build or have built new manufacturing plants in Asia ?

          NOW ASK YOURSELF WHY

          About 4,390,000 resultsList of Ford factories – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
          en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ford_factories‎CachedSimilar
          The following is a list of current and former facilities of Ford Motor Company for …
          2 Former production facilities; 3 Former Branch Assembly Plants,; 4 See also ….
          in 2012.4.4 and building the Ford Kuga for European markets and the Ford …

          Focus on Asia – Sustainability Report 2013/14 – Ford Motor Company
          corporate.ford.com/microsites/sustainability-report…/financial-asia‎Cached
          We are building or have recently opened 10 new plants in Asia Pacific – seven in
          China, two in India and one in Thailand. By 2015 we’ll have the capacity to …

          Ford to Drive Growth in 2014 with Additional Jobs, Three New …
          corporate.ford.com/…/ford-to-drive-growth-in-2014-with-additional-jobs– three-new-worldwide-plants‎CachedSimilar
          Ford Motor Company next year will launch 23 new vehicles to customers … Ford
          to Drive Growth in 2014 with Additional Jobs, Three New Worldwide Plants and
          23 … Ford is set to open two manufacturing facilities in Asia Pacific and one in …

          Financial Health – Ford Asia Pacific and Africa – Sustainability 2012 …
          corporate.ford.com/microsites/sustainability…/world-apa-financial‎CachedSimilar
          The Asia Pacific and Africa (APA) region is our fastest-growing market

  7. BOB McGILL says:

    Just one thing, when I made a comment on another facebook page I got 256 likes in about 2 hours. More than your’s did in 6 months.

  8. BOB McGILL says:

    forbes; ” The Surprising Reasons Why America Lost Its Ability To Compete ”

    http://www.forbes.com/…/the-surprising-reasons-why-america-lost-its-ability-to- compete/‎CachedSimilar
    Mar 10, 2013 … Pay attention to something much more fundamental: America has lost the ability
    to … American business is unable to compete internationally.

    The business leaders indicate in their responses that their high-quality management can’t compete because of government-created constraints, such as the political system, the tax code, the regulations, the legal system, K–12 education, and fiscal policy. In other words, the loss of competitiveness isn’t the business leaders’ fault: “Don’t blame us: we are not responsible!”

    • whungerford says:

      The “business leader’s” comments above sound like self-serving excuses, don’t you think Bob? Much like Tom Reed blaming his poor performance on others as he is wont to do.

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