Tom’s Fracking Letter

The following is a letter that came to the Mayor of the Village of Penn Yan this week. It was dated September 26. It was unsolicited; we did not ask him about his stances on fracking.

Reed's Fracking Letter2

Notice he didn’t say anything about LPG Storage, which would also “disrupt the viability of the local businesses and the quality of life in our Finger Lakes communities”.

I am assuming that a similar letter was sent to the other villages (towns?, cities? counties?) in the Finger Lakes portion of the NY 23rd. It is my understanding that a similar letter has been sent to water related organizations in the Finger Lakes, including the Keuka Lake Association.
This is a blatant use of tax-payers money and the power of his office to campaign for re-election. Is this part of his Campaign’s Secret 11th Hour Surge Strategy?

 

 

 

 

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About pystew

Retired Teacher, political science geek, village trustee. I lean a little left, but like a good political discussion. My blog, the New NY 23rd (http://newny23rd) is about discussing the issues facing the people of our new congressional district. Let's hear all sides of the issues, not just what the candidates want us to hear.
This entry was posted in 2014, Constituents, Environmental and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

60 Responses to Tom’s Fracking Letter

  1. whungerford says:

    Incumbents have many advantages in seeking reelection. Currently Tom enjoys a five week paid vacation that he uses to openly campaign. Watch for franked mail that is campaign material in all but name. In spite of his disclaimer, campaign material posted on Sept. 30 by others remains on Tom’s official facebook page.

    I believe that the claim in Tom’s letter that he has always supported state’s rights is false. Nor do I understand why fracking is too dangerous for the Finger Lakes region but is acceptable in the Chemung or Genesee watersheds.

  2. Anne says:

    We all know that Republicans don’t like science, but I have to wonder at Tom’s failing to account for one of the most obvious things about water: it travels. Why, do you think, he imagines that if areas *around* the FL are fracked, it won’t affect the waters *within* the FL area?

    • whungerford says:

      At the meeting in Hector, Reed was also questioned about oil and gas companies being exempt from the federal Clean Air and Clean Water Acts. He replied that regulating Marcellus Shale drilling should be done by the states. He explained that having the federal government making rules was “big government.” Reed added the federal government would just create “one size fits all” regulations which might not work in every state. This was met with comments from the public that “water doesn’t stop at borders.”
      If Tom had an answer for this, it wasn’t recorded.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      the DEC has a map of all the gas wells in the state. Sencea County has 207, I think, all fracked in the 80s and 90s. Cayuga county has even more.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      NYDEC Downloadable Well Data
      The Division of Mineral Resources maintains a data management system on wells regulated under the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Law (OGSML) To assist the Division in the regulation of wells subject to the OGSML, a database of the wells was created in the early 1980’s and significantly upgraded in 1998 by the adoption of the Risk Based Data Management System. This is primarily a regulatory database. All of this data is created and maintained for the use of the Division and as such is covered by a disclaimer regarding the use of this data.

      Searchable On-Line Database
      The Division of Mineral Resources maintains computerized information on over 40,000 wells. The majority of this information and data is available on-line through the Oil and Gas Searchable Database. This system provides information on well ownership, well owners and operators, registered driller, pluggers and companies that provide financial security instruments. Information on well production as wells as commencement of operations, locations, depths. Downloads from this system should be limited to roughly 800 records. If you attempt to download the entire database the system will time out. Standard report including registered operators, pluggers and drillers are available as wells a popular 90 day look back on issued drilling permits.

      • BOB McGILL says:

        NYDEC-Underground Gas Storage Summary
        Underground Gas Storage
        Natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are stored underground to help meet seasonal and peak demand for gas while providing a relatively stable market for produced gas. Generally, gas is injected into wells when consumer demand is low, and withdrawn when demand increases during times of peak usage over days or seasons. Natural gas is stored in New York in depleted gas reservoirs and salt caverns while LPG is stored in salt caverns and a mined underground cavern.

        2012
        There are 26 natural gas storage facilities and 3 LPG storage facilities in New York, concentrated in the central and western regions near both gas production fields and gas transmission facilities.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage
          •LPG injection/withdrawal wells: 15
          •Total Storage Capacity: 164.7 million gallons
          •Utilization: 217 million gallons injected, 241 million gallons withdrawn
          New York’s three liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) underground storage facilities are located in Cortland, Steuben, and Schuyler Counties. Inergy Midstream, LLC is the owner of the facility in Steuben County and Enterprise Products Operating, LLC is the owner of the facilities in Cortland and Schuyler Counties.

          • BOB McGILL says:

            There are 26 natural gas storage facilities and 3 LPG storage facilities in New York, concentrated in the central and western regions near both gas production fields and gas transmission facilities.

            Natural Gas Storage
            •Natural gas injection/withdrawal and monitoring/observation wells: 957
            •Total storage capacity: 244.8 bcf
            •Utilization: 60.2 bcf injected, 63.7 bcf withdrawn
            •Maximum daily deliverability: 2.76 bcf
            •Working gas capacity: 128.8 bcf
            •Storage at year-end: 196.2 bcf
            •Storage capacity in use at year-end: 80%
            Eight different companies operate the 26 underground natural gas storage fields in New York State, with over half of the storage fields owned by National Fuel Gas Supply. Depleted natural gas reservoirs in the Onondaga, Oriskany and Medina Formations are used by 25 of the facilities, and the remaining one uses a solution-mined cavern in the Syracuse Formation. These formations range in depth from 1,500 to 5,000 feet below the earth’s surface.

            Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage
            •LPG injection/withdrawal wells: 15
            •Total Storage Capacity: 164.7 million gallons
            •Utilization: 217 million gallons injected, 241 million gallons withdrawn
            New York’s three liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) underground storage facilities are located in Cortland, Steuben, and Schuyler Counties. Inergy Midstream, LLC is the owner of the facility in Steuben County and Enterprise Products Operating, LLC is the owner of the facilities in Cortland and Schuyler Counties.

  3. Deb Meeker says:

    Good point Anne, and notice there was no clear definition of what ” the Finger Lakes ” area envelopes. Shall Reed’s definition of the Finger Lakes area mean a perimeter of one to two miles surrounding each lake? Reed’s willful ignorance is astounding, and his belief that we are as ignorant as he – is insulting.

    Tom Reed also does not address what happens to the gas ‘boom towns” once the boom is over, with the jobs leaving town; water depleted, and land unfit for any other purpose into infinity. Nor does Reed address, leaving it up to the states, could preclude federal assistance for the disastrous pollution fracking can cause. It’s just all OK with him – it won’t be around his property.
    “In Pennsylvania’s last extractive boom, the state was stuck with a $5 billion bill to clean up pollution from abandoned mines. What happens when the fracking boom is long gone and communities are stuck with the bill?”
    http://now.tufts.edu/articles/fracking-pro-and-con#sthash.cyGdPfS7.dpuf

    As far as Reed’s misuse of franking mail for his campaigns, that’s nothing new. He’s been called out on it before. It seems Tom Reed doesn’t learn lessons too well – even when caught red-handed.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      I can remember talking to the guys that drilled the gas well just south of Waterloo, back about 1995 or so. ( there is a picture of it on the DEC web site.) These guys went to work around 4 am and moved their big equiptment around late at night. I was one of the few people in town that knew what was going on. Today there is a cell tower on the property and everything else is back to normal. All you have to do is drive around Seneca County and you will see that the farmers are growing crops to within a few feet of the wells. The damage is taken care of by nature, a dirt road that is not used will disappear within a few years. Often the roads are handy for the farmers to use.

      Most of your arguement is totally false. 🙂

      • solodm says:

        Give it up Bob. You would have people believe you have “known, talked with, been related to, grew up with, employed, or been employed, driven by, lived near, or are related to the perfect examples of what ever it is you are trying to sell. I hope all these people can get over being figments of your imagination.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          I don’t live under a rock, how many people do you run into in a day? People like talking to me because I know a lot about a lot of things. Stupid people, on the other hand, criticize. 🙂

    • BOB McGILL says:

      http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/25002.html‎CachedSimilar
      New York’s Mined Land Reclamation Program has as its goal returning land to
      usable condition after mining is completed.

      New York has won many national awards for their mine reclamation program and the mine owners pay for it.

  4. Susan says:

    As a Tioga County resident, I am disgusted to know that my quality of life is of less value than that of the people of Syracuse and NYC, who will have their water sources protected. Tom happens to have a Finger Lakes property, which he appears to believe also deserves to be protected from active drilling. Many in my largely Republican county can’t waito drill. Gov. Cuomo knows he has little support in the area and sees us a asacrifice zone. Greedy pols, Tom, Sen. Libous and Cuomo.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      http://www.dec.ny.gov/energy/46288.html‎CachedSimilar
      The Draft SGEIS for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale was released on
      September 30, 2009 and comments were taken from the … Click on the map for

      http://www.dec.ny.gov/energy/1524.html‎CachedSimilar
      Information on how to access well information and data. … Museum in Albany,
      where many geological records and maps are on file, along with the world’s
      oldest …

    • solodm says:

      Susan, you and others in NY 23rd are not of importance to Reed, not because you live in the Southern Tier, ( he’s an equal opportunity advantagist ) but merely because Tom Reed shines the shoes of his donors. Bootlicking Tom.

      • pystew says:

        Also, Susan mentioned that most in Tioga are in favor of Fracking. He is taking Tioga’s votes for granted. He realizes that he might get more votes from those in the Finger Lakes by saying that they should be exempted from fracking.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          Maybe the people in TIOGA COUNTY know about the 12 MARCELLUS SHALE gas wells in STUBEN, CHEMUNG, SCHULYER, ALLEGANY AND LIVINGSTON COUNTIES.

  5. Nancy Padak says:

    I agree with Susan. Moreover, what about the other bodies of water [and all that brings, per Tom’s letter] in NY23, elsewhere in NYS, and– for that matter– the nation? I wonder if other mayors received a similar letter? I also wonder where Tom thinks this protection should stop.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      what don’t you people understand about the fact that thousands of wells in NEW YORK were fracked years ago ?

      • solodm says:

        Different kind of drilling, Bob. For all your citations, you haven’t seemed to learn a thing.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          drilling is NOT THE ISSUE, the fracking IS THE ISSUE
          NYDEC says “New York counties with actively producing gas wells reported in 2010 were: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Cayuga, Chautauqua, Chemung, Chenango, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Madison, Niagara, Ontario, Oswego, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Tioga, Wayne, Wyoming and Yates.
          Hydraulic fracturing is a well stimulation technique which consists of pumping a fluid and a proppant such as sand down the wellbore under high pressure to create fractures in the
          hydrocarbon-bearing rock. No blast or explosion is created by the hydraulic fracturing process. The proppant holds the fractures open, allowing hydrocarbons to flow into the wellbore after injected fluids are recovered. Hydraulic fracturing technology was first developed in the late 1940s and, accordingly, it was addressed in the 1992 GEIS. It is estimated that as many as 90% of wells drilled in New York are hydraulically fractured.”

        • BOB McGILL says:

          pasted from the DEC
          Horizontal drilling has been used in New York since the 1980s. A “horizontal well” is first drilled down vertically to a depth above the target gas-bearing rock formation. Special tools are then used to curve the well so that the hole is drilled horizontally within the gas-bearing rock for up to several thousand feet. Ten percent of DEC’s 2007 well drilling permits were for directional and horizontal wells.

          DON’T MISS THIS PART

          Except for special tools used underground, horizontal drilling is performed using the same equipment and technology as vertical drilling, with the same protocols in place for aquifer protection, fluid containment and waste handling.

      • pystew says:

        Fracking has been used to blast pathways for water wells, and vertical wells for quite some time. The degree of magnitude is the basic difference. A vertically fracked well for gas uses a max of 80,000 gallons of water while horizontally fracked (HVHF) drilled wells can range from 3 to 8 million gallons of water used.

        The technology for drilling on a HVHF basis was generated back in the 1990’s while gas drilled wells have existed for 75 years. Industry types claim that HVHF drilling has been around for 60-70 nyears. They try to cloud the issue by saying that they have been around from our grandparents time. They are lying.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      http://www.dec.ny.gov/energy/46288.html‎CachedSimilar
      Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing are legal and common in New York. …
      No known instances of groundwater contamination have occurred from …

    • BOB McGILL says:

      you have been drinking too much lake water.
      http://www.health.ny.gov/publications/2768.pdf‎Cached
      contaminated than fish from Lake Ontario and … The primary chemicals of
      concern in the Finger Lakes region are PCBs, dioxin, mirex … COMMON FISH OF
      THE.
      Health Risks
      The primary chemicals of concern in the Finger Lakes region are PCBs, dioxin, mirex and mercury. These chemicals build up in your body over time. Health problems that may result from chemicals in fish range from small changes in health that are hard to detect to birth defects and cancer. (Visit http://www.health.ny.gov/fish for more info.)

      • BOB McGILL says:

        The most frequently cited sources affecting water quality in the basin are agricultural activity and urban/stormwater runoff. Habitat modification and streambank erosion are also often noted as contributing sources. The sources of the more severe impairments to the waters of the basin include toxic/contaminated sediments from past/historical discharges, municipal point discharges, landfill disposal and urban/stormwater runoff. Combined sewer overflows and untreated or inadequately treated sanitary discharges have also been noted. Most of the lake acres listed as Threatened are listed as being the result of Other Sources. These listings can be interpreted as including a wide range of unspecified potential sources that may impact future water
        quality in the basin.

        hey pystew where does Penn Yan dump it’s sewer water ?

        • BOB McGILL says:

          Half of the impaired lake acres are the result of a fish consumption advisory for one lake (Keuka Lake). wasn’t this because of DDT ?
          been eating too much fish pstew ?

  6. pystew says:

    Bob, you last letters can not be shown. I think it is that you are replying to a reply of a reply…this software only permits 3 layers of replies. Also, could you define what you mean by “Fracking”–since all of these wells have been ‘fracked’ by your definition. I want to see how yours is different that the DEC’s definition.:)

    • BOB McGILL says:

      my definition was formed by using DEC definitions and reading the information that the DEC provides, along with info from other states and the EPA, USGS, NYGS.

      I am not a democrat, I don’t make up my own difinitions 🙂

    • BOB McGILL says:

      http://www.dec.ny.gov/energy/46288.html‎CachedSimilar
      The Draft SGEIS for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale was released on …
      2009 and comments were taken from the public until December 31, 2009. … gas-
      bearing rock formation, so that more gas can be produced from a single well.

  7. pystew says:

    You stated what sources you used to form your definition of fracking, but failed to tell us your definition. What fracking fluids are used in the examples you site?

    • BOB McGILL says:

      David Porges, the CEO of EQT Corporation, a major natural gas company, spoke to an audience of about 100 people at the University of Charleston on Thursday night about fracking, coal and greenhouse gases. (See article.)

      Porges said the chemicals used in the fracking process are no worse than the ones you find in your own home. He added that all the chemicals used in fracking are available on frackfocus.org, which is run by the Groundwater Protection Council.

      https://fracktivism.wordpress.com/tag/frackfocus/‎Cached

      • BOB McGILL says:

        SGEIS Spills the Beans on Naturally Occurring Methane in NY Water
        9:09pm EDT July 5, 2011

        by John Krohn
        johnk@energyindepth.org, Washington, D.C.
        Over the next few days we will be skimming through the updated Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement (SGEIS), available here, which was recently released by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. For today, our focus will be on methane in private wells and groundwater throughout New York’s history as relayed by the SGEIS. For a post like this, its best to let the SGEIS speak for itself:

        The presence of naturally occurring methane in ground seeps and water wells is well documented throughout New York State.
        NYSDEC SGEIS Pg. 4-38

        The existence of naturally occurring methane seeps in New York has been known since the mid 1600s.
        NYSDEC SGEIS Pg. 4-38

        In his 1966 report on the Jamestown Aquifer, Crain explained that natural gas could occur in any water well in the area which ends in bedrock or in unconsolidated deposits overlain by fine-grained confining.
        NYSDEC SGEIS Pg. 4-38

        Gas that occurs naturally in shallow bedrock and unconsolidated sediments has been known to seep to the surface and/or contaminate water supplies including water wells. Often landowners are not aware of the presence of methane in their well.
        NYDEC SGEIS Pg. 4-39

    • BOB McGILL says:

      the fracking chemicals approved by the DEC. 🙂

    • BOB McGILL says:

      fracfocus.org/chemical-use/what-chemicals-are-used‎CachedSimilar
      Chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing have many functions. A list of these
      chemicals is provided by name, number, purpose and function.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has played an important role in the development of America’s oil and natural gas resources for nearly 60 years. In the U.S., an estimated 35,000 wells are processed with the hydraulic fracturing method; it’s estimated that over one million wells have been hydraulically fractured since the first well in the late 1940s. Each well is a little different, and each one offers lessons learned. The oil and natural gas production industry uses these lessons to develop best practices to minimize the environmental and societal impacts associated with development.
      http://www.energyfromshale.org

      • BOB McGILL says:

        there was a case where people in NE Penn. started to complain that their water was contaminated by fracking, shortly after 7 wells were drilled. What they didn’t know was that the wells had not been fracked yet.
        OOOOOOOOPS
        The process of bringing a well to completion is generally short-lived, taking only 70 to 100 days for a single well, after which the well can be in production for 20 to 40 years. The process for a single horizontal well typically includes four to eight weeks to prepare the site for drilling, four or five weeks of rig work, including casing and cementing and moving all associated auxiliary equipment off the well site before fracturing operations commence, and two to five days for the entire multi-stage fracturing operation.

        Once completed, the production site is reduced to about the size of a two-car garage. The remainder of the site is restored to its original condition and the environmental benefits, such as reduced air and greenhouse gas emissions, last for decades. Local impacts, such as noise, dust, and land disturbance, are largely confined to the initial phase of development.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      YOU DIDN’T READ THIS DID YOU–” The Draft SGEIS for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale was released on September 30, 2009 and comments were taken from the …
      EVERYTHING ANYONE WANTS TO KNOW IS RIGHT IN THIS SGEIS. Use the link I provided earlier. If the link doesn’t work find it yourself, just copy and paste ” . The Draft SGEIS for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale was released on September 30, 2009″ into your search box and click on the little magnifying glass.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      http://www.dec.ny.gov/energy/46288.html‎CachedSimilar
      The Draft SGEIS for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale was released on …
      2009 and comments were taken from the public until December 31, 2009. … gas-
      bearing rock formation, so that more gas can be produced from a single well.

  8. BOB McGILL says:

    this is going to cause real problems for the anti-frackers because it is going to prove that people shouldn’t be drinking the water anyway

    http://www.jaeckle.com/…/ ProposedNYSDECRegsGuardAgainstContributingFactors‎Cached
    Dec 8, 2011 … The USEPA draft report on groundwater contamination in Wyoming caused by
    high … would have violated proposed NYSDEC requirements and regulations. …
    well baseline data to compare before and after drilling contamination. … must test
    local well water before, during and after HVHF drilling occurs.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      you do know how to read don’t you ?

      First, USEPA has tentatively concluded that shallow groundwater had been contaminated due to the use of surface pits for disposal of drilling cuttings, flowback and produced water. Such pits are prohibited under the NYSDEC proposed requirements and regulations for flowback and produced water, and only certain air or freshwater based drill cuttings could be managed and disposed in an on-site lined pit.

      Second, USEPA noted that it was difficult to determine the source of deep groundwater contamination because (a) proprietary ingredients in the fracking additives were not known, so it was unknown whether some groundwater contaminants originated from those ingredients; and (b) there was very limited domestic well baseline data to compare before and after drilling contamination. Neither of these difficulties should occur in New York, because under the NYSDEC proposals all fracking fluid additives must be disclosed by a HVHF permit applicant and a permittee must test local well water before, during and after HVHF drilling occurs.

  9. BOB McGILL says:

    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6104a1.htm?s_cid…‎Cached
    Aug 10, 2012 … However, some children are still exposed to lead in drinking water. …. as well water has levels that are higher than the U.S. GM level for children (1.4 …
    PRIVATE WELLS CURRENTLY ARE NOT REGULATED BY THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
    (EPA). Private well owners are responsible for the quality of their drinking water. Homeowners with private wells are generally not required to test their drinking water. However, they can use the public drinking water standards as guidelines to ensure drinking water quality. Refer to the factsheet Drinking Water Standards for more information.

    • BOB McGILL says:

      should I tell them that a random test of private wells in Ontario County, by the DEC, showed that 48 % were contaminated with pesticides ? That the levels of Atrazine in Seneca Lake are a serious problem.
      http://www.nrdc.org/health/atrazine/‎CachedSimilar
      Aug 22, 2009 … NRDC: Atrazine Continues to Contaminate Surface Water and Drinking Water in the United States.

      • solodm says:

        Oh lord – the “same protections”? We’re all doomed.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          THAT’S OHIO, NOT THE SAME ! 🙂 NICE TRY THOUGH

        • BOB McGILL says:

          GEE, the gas business in Ohio is almost as dangerous as pee wee baseball.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          LOOK WHO’S PROVIDING THE INFO. People making money brainwashing the public.
          About
          The People’s Oil & Gas Collaborative – Ohio (POGCO) represents the original Ohio grassroots movement focusing 100% on oil and gas issues. Our multi-tiered approach involves people who are directly affected by the impacts of oil and gas development working in a nonpartisan effort for reform at local, state and federal levels. We utilize public education, legislative initiatives and community partnerships in our mission to provide surface owners, oil and gas employees and citizens living near operations fair and equal treatment under the law with regard to health, safety and property rights. To read more on the genesis of POGCO, see our History.

          Kari Matsko, Director

          Kari Matsko initiated the oil and gas grassroots movement in Ohio, formerly known as Northeast Ohio Gas Accountability Project (NEOGAP). She has sixteen years of experience in technical consulting on national and international projects. Amendments to improve Ohio’s oil and gas law in 2010 and passage of numerous local resolutions revoking mandatory pooling and returning local control were some of her successes. Kari’s on the job field training in oil and gas and collaborations with industry and scientific communities led her to be appointed to Ohio’s regulatory rule-making work group. She was also chosen as the citizen and environmental review team member from Ohio for the national State Review of Oil & Natural Gas Environmental Regulations (STRONGER) 2011 Hydraulic Fracturing analysis. Kari serves on the Board of Directors of ShaleTest as well as various advisory council roles for several state and national oil and gas nonprofit projects. In 2013 she was chosen to represent the U.S. on two NGO shale delegations to Russia and Ukraine.

          Kathryn Hanratty, Director of Water Affairs

          Kathryn Hanratty is a long time Water advocate from Chardon, Ohio. Through her work with Audubon, the Ohio Environmental Council and numerous other organizations, she has been a recipient of national and state environmental awards. As owner of Enviroscapes Landscape Design in Chardon, Ohio Kathy designs and installs environmentally friendly landscapes. She frequently contributes articles for various local publications, has taught classes and done presentations on the use of native plants in the landscape and many different environmental issues for numerous Ohio organizations. Kathy also serves on the Board of the Native Plant Society of Northeastern Ohio and is one of the organizers of Frack-Free Geauga.

        • BOB McGILL says:

          http://www.ohioenergyresource.org/topics/standards-and-regulations
          DON’T MISS THE LINE THAT SAYS ” Since hydraulic fracturing began in the 1940’s, more than 1 million wells have been drilled using this technology.

          Companies producing natural gas from the shale formations adhere to these strict standards when planning for and operating their wells. Many of these companies are also the ones who developed the standards, and have been using them in production for years, if not decades. Since hydraulic fracturing began in the 1940’s, more than 1 million wells have been drilled using this technology. The companies that continue to follow these strict standards and regulations will protect the safety and health of all citizens and the environment. API and its member companies also continually monitor and update these standards to ensure operational safety and efficiency

          • pystew says:

            Fracking has been used to blast pathways for water wells, and vertical wells for quite some time. The degree of magnitude is the basic difference. A vertically fracked well for gas uses a max of 80,000 gallons of water while horizontally fracked (HVHF) drilled wells can range from 3 to 8 million gallons of water used.

            The technology for drilling on a HVHF basis was generated back in the 1990’s while gas drilled wells have existed for 75 years. Industry types claim that HVHF drilling has been around for 60-70 nyears. They try to cloud the issue by saying that they have been around from our grandparents time. They are lying.

  10. BOB McGILL says:

    YOU ASKED A QUESTION AND STILL DIDN’T READ MY ANSWER. Gas wells have been around since the early 1800s. 13 trillion gallons of water go over Niagara Falls everyday and goes to the ocean unused. Your use of the word BLAST is misleading there is NO BLAST. While you still insist that the gas companies won’t disclose the chemicals used there is page after page of chemicals on the DEC links and they have been public for over 5 years. The DEC has a data base on 40,000 wells where you can look up everything you would want to know.
    You people have been too loud for too long to dig yourselves out of this one.

  11. BOB McGILL says:

    hey pstew, you use your own words in your comments, but I copy and paste almost every word from the experts. Everything in your last comment is FALSE ! So who’s the liar 🙂

  12. BOB McGILL says:

    Natural gas seeps in Ontario County, New York were first
    reported in 1669 by the French explorer, M. de La Salle,
    and a French missionary, M. de Galinee, who were shown
    the springs by local Native Americans. William Hart, a local
    gunsmith, drilled the first commercial natural gas well in the
    United States in 1821 in Fredonia, Chautauqua County. The
    Hart well was first dug to a depth of 27 feet in the shale that
    outcropped in the area. A 1.5 inch diameter borehole was then
    drilled to a depth of 70 feet. Hart built a simple gas meter and
    piped the natural gas to an innkeeper on the stagecoach route
    from Buffalo to Cleveland.

    see that 1821

  13. Susan says:

    Wow. bob loves fracking. Enough said.

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