Tom’s Fracking Letter

The following is a letter that came to the Mayor of the Village of Penn Yan this week. It was dated September 26. It was unsolicited; we did not ask him about his stances on fracking.

Reed's Fracking Letter2

Notice he didn’t say anything about LPG Storage, which would also “disrupt the viability of the local businesses and the quality of life in our Finger Lakes communities”.

I am assuming that a similar letter was sent to the other villages (towns?, cities? counties?) in the Finger Lakes portion of the NY 23rd. It is my understanding that a similar letter has been sent to water related organizations in the Finger Lakes, including the Keuka Lake Association.
This is a blatant use of tax-payers money and the power of his office to campaign for re-election. Is this part of his Campaign’s Secret 11th Hour Surge Strategy?

 

 

 

 

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About pystew

Retired Teacher, political science geek, village trustee. I lean a little left, but like a good political discussion. My blog, the New NY 23rd (http://newny23rd) is about discussing the issues facing the people of our new congressional district. Let's hear all sides of the issues, not just what the candidates want us to hear.
This entry was posted in 2014, Constituents, Environmental and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

60 Responses to Tom’s Fracking Letter

  1. BOB McGILL says:

    LOOK WHO’S PROVIDING THE INFO. People making money brainwashing the public.
    About
    The People’s Oil & Gas Collaborative – Ohio (POGCO) represents the original Ohio grassroots movement focusing 100% on oil and gas issues. Our multi-tiered approach involves people who are directly affected by the impacts of oil and gas development working in a nonpartisan effort for reform at local, state and federal levels. We utilize public education, legislative initiatives and community partnerships in our mission to provide surface owners, oil and gas employees and citizens living near operations fair and equal treatment under the law with regard to health, safety and property rights. To read more on the genesis of POGCO, see our History.

    Kari Matsko, Director

    Kari Matsko initiated the oil and gas grassroots movement in Ohio, formerly known as Northeast Ohio Gas Accountability Project (NEOGAP). She has sixteen years of experience in technical consulting on national and international projects. Amendments to improve Ohio’s oil and gas law in 2010 and passage of numerous local resolutions revoking mandatory pooling and returning local control were some of her successes. Kari’s on the job field training in oil and gas and collaborations with industry and scientific communities led her to be appointed to Ohio’s regulatory rule-making work group. She was also chosen as the citizen and environmental review team member from Ohio for the national State Review of Oil & Natural Gas Environmental Regulations (STRONGER) 2011 Hydraulic Fracturing analysis. Kari serves on the Board of Directors of ShaleTest as well as various advisory council roles for several state and national oil and gas nonprofit projects. In 2013 she was chosen to represent the U.S. on two NGO shale delegations to Russia and Ukraine.

    Kathryn Hanratty, Director of Water Affairs

    Kathryn Hanratty is a long time Water advocate from Chardon, Ohio. Through her work with Audubon, the Ohio Environmental Council and numerous other organizations, she has been a recipient of national and state environmental awards. As owner of Enviroscapes Landscape Design in Chardon, Ohio Kathy designs and installs environmentally friendly landscapes. She frequently contributes articles for various local publications, has taught classes and done presentations on the use of native plants in the landscape and many different environmental issues for numerous Ohio organizations. Kathy also serves on the Board of the Native Plant Society of Northeastern Ohio and is one of the organizers of Frack-Free Geauga.

  2. BOB McGILL says:

    http://www.ohioenergyresource.org/topics/standards-and-regulations
    DON’T MISS THE LINE THAT SAYS ” Since hydraulic fracturing began in the 1940’s, more than 1 million wells have been drilled using this technology.

    Companies producing natural gas from the shale formations adhere to these strict standards when planning for and operating their wells. Many of these companies are also the ones who developed the standards, and have been using them in production for years, if not decades. Since hydraulic fracturing began in the 1940’s, more than 1 million wells have been drilled using this technology. The companies that continue to follow these strict standards and regulations will protect the safety and health of all citizens and the environment. API and its member companies also continually monitor and update these standards to ensure operational safety and efficiency

  3. pystew says:

    Fracking has been used to blast pathways for water wells, and vertical wells for quite some time. The degree of magnitude is the basic difference. A vertically fracked well for gas uses a max of 80,000 gallons of water while horizontally fracked (HVHF) drilled wells can range from 3 to 8 million gallons of water used.

    The technology for drilling on a HVHF basis was generated back in the 1990’s while gas drilled wells have existed for 75 years. Industry types claim that HVHF drilling has been around for 60-70 nyears. They try to cloud the issue by saying that they have been around from our grandparents time. They are lying.

  4. pystew says:

    Fracking has been used to blast pathways for water wells, and vertical wells for quite some time. The degree of magnitude is the basic difference. A vertically fracked well for gas uses a max of 80,000 gallons of water while horizontally fracked (HVHF) drilled wells can range from 3 to 8 million gallons of water used.

    The technology for drilling on a HVHF basis was generated back in the 1990’s while gas drilled wells have existed for 75 years. Industry types claim that HVHF drilling has been around for 60-70 nyears. They try to cloud the issue by saying that they have been around from our grandparents time. They are lying.

  5. BOB McGILL says:

    YOU ASKED A QUESTION AND STILL DIDN’T READ MY ANSWER. Gas wells have been around since the early 1800s. 13 trillion gallons of water go over Niagara Falls everyday and goes to the ocean unused. Your use of the word BLAST is misleading there is NO BLAST. While you still insist that the gas companies won’t disclose the chemicals used there is page after page of chemicals on the DEC links and they have been public for over 5 years. The DEC has a data base on 40,000 wells where you can look up everything you would want to know.
    You people have been too loud for too long to dig yourselves out of this one.

  6. BOB McGILL says:

    hey pstew, you use your own words in your comments, but I copy and paste almost every word from the experts. Everything in your last comment is FALSE ! So who’s the liar 🙂

  7. BOB McGILL says:

    Natural gas seeps in Ontario County, New York were first
    reported in 1669 by the French explorer, M. de La Salle,
    and a French missionary, M. de Galinee, who were shown
    the springs by local Native Americans. William Hart, a local
    gunsmith, drilled the first commercial natural gas well in the
    United States in 1821 in Fredonia, Chautauqua County. The
    Hart well was first dug to a depth of 27 feet in the shale that
    outcropped in the area. A 1.5 inch diameter borehole was then
    drilled to a depth of 70 feet. Hart built a simple gas meter and
    piped the natural gas to an innkeeper on the stagecoach route
    from Buffalo to Cleveland.

    see that 1821

  8. Susan says:

    Wow. bob loves fracking. Enough said.

  9. pystew says:

    What is incorrect about the research I found?

  10. pystew says:

    They fracked in Fredonia in 1821? The comment dealt with HVHF, not when the White man first saw gas seeping out of the ground.

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