Arithmetic

hexEngineers and computer programmers commonly do arithmetic computations using hexadecimal notation. Here is an example:

1A7 + C3 = 26A

Such computations needn’t be done mentally–we have hexadecimal calculators for speed and accuracy–although many are adept at it. Few practiced this much in school, but that matters little. If one understands mathematical principles, it is quite easy to master something new.

common coreMathematician Solomon Friedberg, writing in USA Today explains that students are best served by lessons that promote understanding:

Here is what good math learning produces: Students who can compute correctly and wisely, choosing  the best way to do a given computation; students who can explain what they are doing when they solve a problem or use math to analyze a situation; and students who have the flexibility and understanding to find the best approach to a new problem.

Noting that Common Core is “a list of topics everyone knows we should teach,” Friedberg continues:

Common Core promotes this. It systematically and coherently specifies the topics and connections needed for math to make sense, and promotes both understanding and accuracy.

I recommend Friedberg’s article, cited below, to anyone with questions or concerns about Common Core.

© William Hungerford – September 2014

http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2014/09/15/common-core-math-education-standards-fluency-column/15693531/

 

 

 

 

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About whungerford

* Contributor at NewNY23rd.com where we discuss the politics, economics, and events of the New New York 23rd Congressional District (Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, (Eastern) Ontario, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben,Tioga, Tompkins, and Yates Counties) Please visit and comment on whatever strikes your fancy.
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